All American Western 104 – Johnny Thunder faces the gun, Tony Barrett helps the boy, and Foley vs the Mysterious Marauder

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The climax of the Johnny Thunder story makes the cover of All American Western 104 (Dec. 48).

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Kanigher and Toth relate this tale, in which a gang lead by Raze plots to attack Mesa because the sheriff is so old.  Curiously, even before his gang rides in, Raze tells them that Johnny Thunder protects the town.

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Sheriff Tane is busy insulting his son.  John, ever patient, once again tries to explain the benefits of education.

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When Raze’s men grab the sheriff, Johnny Thunder takes to his horse, Black Lightning, and tracks the gang down.  He loses his gun in the battle, but that does not stop him from walking right up to Raze, lambasting him the entire time for being weak.  Raze just stands there amazed, and Johnny takes the opportunity to knock him out.  Sheriff Tane actually concedes that his son was right, but only to Johnny Thunder. I doubt he repeated it to John.  Of course, the two are the same anyway.

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Hasen and Giacoia have Tony Barrett come to the aid of a young boy in this Overland Coach story.

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The boy’s parents were murdered by a man who wanted their property, and who is now taking advantage of the child’s lack of paperwork to move on the land.  With no real help from any man, Tony finds and captures the killer, ensuring that the boy gets to keep his property.  Some really nice art on this tale.

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Kubert and Giunta have fun with the Foley of the Fighting 5th story in this issue, as Dan Foley has to chase down a masked thief, the Mysterious Marauder.

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It isn’t too difficult for either Dan or the reader to determine that the robber is the British emigre, Mr. Torbin, who keeps a portrait of a nasty looking ancestor on his wall.  When questioned about it by Dan, he dismisses it as being no one of importance, which is really about as suspicious as it could be.

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Dan recognizes the painting as being of the notorious British highwayman Dan Turpin, which clues him in that Torbin has changed his name, but kept up the family business.

The only negative thing I have to say is that Giunta quashes Kubert’s pencils.

 

 

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